On Friday, April 3, I launched a fan fiction series, “Andrew & Amy,” about America’s governor, that’s right, Andrew M. Cuomo, and me. Progressives may be angry about the new budget’s Medicaid cuts, the punt on medical marijuana, and the slap in the face to Working Families, but most New Yorkers agree he is handling the plague with leadership seen virtually nowhere else, except Washington, Oregon, California, Connecticut, and New Jersey. Because of the job he’s doing, his Queens accent (with a hint of self-invented Italian?), his buff bod, and his incredible hairline, some of us are a little bit, um, obsessed.

Published by TheWoolfer, this is a diary of my own journey through the plague as a divorced mom in “the land of no dishwashers, Brooklyn” but told through fantasy. Andrew is everyone I ever wanted in an age-appropriate divorced dad. Second installment runs 4/10 but read the first one here. A little teaser to get you going:

I was divorced and lonely, and so was the governor. I called my friend Peter, a ghostwriter in Westchester. “I wish there were a way I could get to him,” I said.

“One of his speechwriters is an author,” Peter said. “I know him a little. Let me see what I can do.”

I found the guy’s profile on LinkedIn, a political biographer who transitioned to speechwriting. A few hours later I got a call from a 518 number. “I need you to help me with something important,” I told Ken. “I’m age appropriate and separated half a year. The governor talks about being alone, says he isn’t even excited to see Captain the dog. I know what he’s saying. He wants a companion, a woman, but he’s scared, like the rest of us.”

“Peter said you wanted to talk to me about a virtual reading for my Lyndon Johnson biography. He said you could guarantee a hundred participants.”

“I had to get you to call. I need to meet the governor. I’m the girl for him, he just doesn’t know it. I got divorced to find a real life partner. It’s him. I feel it on a cellular level. This is a soulmate situation and if you know a thing or two about soulmates, intermediaries figure prominently.”